Can Atrial Fibrillation Give Me a Heart Attack?

Can Atrial Fibrillation Give Me a Heart Attack?

Many patients, when they have episodes of atrial fibrillation, they can feel chest pain and feel as if they are having a heart attack. So, can atrial fibrillation actually give you a heart attack?

The answer to that question is both yes and no. In this article I will explain why I answer it that way.

Is the KETO DIET SAFE for AFib Patients?

Is the KETO DIET SAFE for AFib Patients?

Today I will be discussing the keto diet and for anyone with atrial fibrillation- what you should be aware of if you are considering the keto diet.

The keto diet is an extremely popular and controversial diet right now, and it was actually one of the top Google search terms of 2018, so there are many, many people interested in the keto diet, and I've had several patients of mine ask me about the keto diet and whether I think it's safe for them to use since they have atrial fibrillation.

How Does a Cardioversion Help With Atrial Fibrillation?

How Does a Cardioversion Help With Atrial Fibrillation?

In this article, I will be discussing cardioversions, and how they can be helpful for patients who have atrial fibrillation.

So, first of all, what is a cardioversion? A cardioversion is an electrical shock to your heart to try to reset your heart, to get you out of Atrial Fibrillation, and back to Normal Sinus Rhythm. You may have seen on TV, or in a movie when somebody's heart stops, and they take the electrical paddles and give them the electrical shock to bring them back to life. Meanwhile, your favorite actor will yell usually -“Everyone Clear!”

Can Weight Loss Improve your AFib

Can Weight Loss Improve your AFib

Obesity is a worldwide problem with a significant presence in the United States. People with obesity are much more susceptible to developing health conditions such as high blood pressure, diabetes, and sleep apnea, as well as heart disease. Of these adverse health conditions, the risk of heart disease includes, but is not limited to, atrial fibrillation.

Can AFib Be Cured?

Can AFib Be Cured?

As Information and technology surrounding atrial fibrillation continue to improve, a question that I often get is, “can AFib be cured?”

To better answer that question, we first must identify what a cure means. My strict definition of a cure for atrial fibrillation is that through either a procedure, medication, or a lifestyle change a patient has zero episodes of AFib for the rest of their life with absolutely no symptoms. If we adhere to that definition, unfortunately, the answer is no; there is no cure for atrial fibrillation.

What is Cryptogenic Stroke

What is Cryptogenic Stroke

A cryptogenic stroke (CS) is technically defined as cerebral ischemia (stroke) of obscure or unknown origin. This is basically a fancy way of saying that a patient has had a stroke, yet doctors have not determined a cause. The cause of CS remains unknown because the event is transitory or reversible, medical tests have not been exhaustive, or because some causes truly remain unknown. One-third of the ischemic strokes is cryptogenic.

When Should I See an Electrophysiologist?

When Should I See an Electrophysiologist?

When you learn you have a heart condition, it’s likely you assume you’ll need to visit a cardiologist. However, not all cardiologists specialize in treating every issue related to the heart.

If you have heart arrhythmias or another heart rhythm disorder like atrial fibrillation, you actually should be visiting an electrophysiologist. As both a Cardiologist and Electrophysiologist, patients often ask me what the difference is between the two.

How Does Sleep Apnea Affect AFib?

How Does Sleep Apnea Affect AFib?

Atrial fibrillation, or AFib, affects an estimated 6 million Americans. It is an arrhythmia characterized by an irregular heartbeat that can lead to stroke and other heart-related complications.

Although atrial fibrillation can have a range of causes, research reveals a strong link between AFib and Obstructive Sleep Apnea, or OSA.

How Does Cold Weather Affect Atrial Fibrillation?

How Does Cold Weather Affect Atrial Fibrillation?

A common question I get is whether cold weather and atrial fibrillation have any relation. We’re well into wintertime now in the United States and many of us are outside in frigid temperatures. So, the question is, does cold weather actually have an effect on atrial fibrillation? Do people get more frequent episodes of AFib during the wintertime?

Three Holiday Tips from Dr. AFib

Three Holiday Tips from Dr. AFib

With the Holidays and New Years right around the corner, it’s important to examine how your changing habits around these festivities can affect your AFib. How do the holidays actually affect a person's atrial fibrillation or potentially increase a person's risk for getting episodes of AFib? There are a variety of ways in which the holidays can affect a person's AFib and trigger episodes.

Can a Watchman Procedure Reduce My Risk for Stroke?

Can a Watchman Procedure Reduce My Risk for Stroke?

There are millions of patients throughout the United States living with atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation is the most common irregular heart rhythm, which can significantly increase a patient’s risk of stroke. A patient with atrial fibrillation is 5 times more likely to have a stroke then someone without atrial fibrillation. But why is someone with atrial fibrillation more likely to have a stroke?

THREE Ways to Save Money on Your Eliquis Prescriptions

THREE Ways to Save Money on Your Eliquis Prescriptions

Since being FDA approved in 2012, Eliquis has become an excellent option for the prevention of stroke in patients with nonvalvular atrial fibrillation. Eliquis was approved based on the results of the 2011 ARISTOTLE Trial. During this trial, over 18,000 patients were studied. Eliquis was compared to Warfarin over a mean period of 1.8 years. During this study Eliquis was shown to be superior to Warfarin in reducing risk of stroke. Patients taking Eliquis also showed significantly less risk for major bleeding compared to Warfarin.

What Do I Need to Know About Digoxin?

What Do I Need to Know About Digoxin?

After isolation from the digitalis plant, the medication digoxin was first used in the 1930’s to treat a variety of heart conditions in both pill and intravenous form. Digoxin remains one of the most frequently prescribed drugs in the management of atrial fibrillation.

Does Magnesium Help With Atrial Fibrillation?

Does Magnesium Help With Atrial Fibrillation?

When a patient goes online and searches about magnesium and AFib, they will find an abundance of information on its use. There are several web pages promoting magnesium use as a natural treatment for atrial fibrillation in addition to promoting several over the counter supplements for magnesium. But what does the data show? Is there any medical literature that says magnesium is beneficial for atrial fibrillation?

The Dr. AFib Review of the KardiaMobile and KardiaBand

The Dr. AFib Review of the KardiaMobile and KardiaBand

Over the last several years there has been an emergence of wearable devices and other at home technology aimed at monitoring people’s health. This includes the development of smart watches and activity sensors such as Fitbit and Apple Watch.  With over 5 millions Americans being diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, it’s no surprise many companies have started to offer at home monitoring for atrial fibrillation.  These devices provide a unique opportunity for patients to monitor their AFib together with their doctor. Of the devices currently on the market, the most popular is the KardiaMobile and the KardiaBand, which are both made by AliveCor. 

Dr. AFib’s 7 Most Commonly Asked Questions

Dr. AFib’s 7 Most Commonly Asked Questions

Between caring for thousands of patients at Vital Heart and Vein and supporting my online audience, I have noticed that there are several questions that seem to get asked more frequently than others. It’s for this reason that I wanted to compile some of these commonly asked questions, especially for those recently diagnosed with #AFib who may be feeling these same questions bubbling in their minds. As always, this information is educational in nature, please discuss with your own doctor before making any medical decisions regarding your health.

AFib and Coronary Artery Disease

AFib and Coronary Artery Disease

AFib and coronary artery disease are two very common heart conditions. Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common cardiovascular disease, while atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common cardiac arrhythmia. Still, there’s a great deal of misunderstanding on how coronary artery disease and atrial fibrillation relate to each other and how to manage patients that may have both conditions.

AFib and Congestive Heart Failure

AFib and Congestive Heart Failure

Considering overall heart health, there are often other heart  issues that go along with atrial fibrillation. A common condition those living with AFib often face is congestive heart failure, commonly known as CHF. CHF often refers to a weak heart but can also signify a stiff heart, meaning it doesn’t pump blood efficiently throughout the body.  

This can lead to back-flow, causing fluid buildup in the lungs or swelling of the legs, which are the most common symptoms of congestive heart failure.

For the Caregivers of Someone Living with AFib

For the Caregivers of Someone Living with AFib

If you are the caregiver or loved one of someone dealing with a complicated medical condition, such as atrial fibrillation, this post is for you.

First, I would like to begin by saying, “Thank you”. I understand that navigating this condition as a caregiver can often be stressful and demanding.

Now, I’d like to offer you some tips for caring for someone with atrial fibrillation, so you can better understand the condition and what you may need to do if complications arise.

The Dr. AFib Guide to Healthy Living

The Dr. AFib Guide to Healthy Living

Upon first meeting with a new patient, I frequently explain that we will have both short-term goals and long-term goals in the course of their care. Many patients diagnosed with atrial fibrillation will need a strategy they can utilize for decades, but the management of atrial fibrillation requires a two-pronged strategy and it is necessary to address both immediate and future goals to achieve the best possible outcomes.